Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Aerangis articulata

Aerangis articulata - Flower photo by Richard LindbergAerangis articulata has bloomed after three years. It was a gift and is my only Aerangis. I have had it in a different microclimate each year and the plant seemed to get weaker each time I moved it. This spring I moved it to a lower light area and of course the whole greenhouse is three degrees warmer that previous years.

Aerangis articulata - Plant photo by Richard LindbergThe genus Aerangis (Aergs) contains about 50 species spread through Africa, Madagascar and the Comoros Islands. Aerangis articulata grows in Madagascar and Comoran. Warm to hot growing, fragrant, grows best mounted. It is fragrant and blooms in fall.

I will not be adding more Aerangis species. This has been interesting, but I am trying to be more focused on stated collection goal of New World orchids.

Aerangis articulata

Aerangis articulata - Flower photo by Richard LindbergAerangis articulata has bloomed after three years. It was a gift and is my only Aerangis. I have had it in a different micro-climate each year and the plant seemed to get weaker each time I moved it. This spring I moved it to a lower light area and of course the whole greenhouse is three degrees warmer that previous years.

Aerangis articulata - Plant photo by Richard LindbergThe genus Aerangis (Aergs) contains about 50 species spread through Africa, Madagascar and the Comoros Islands. Aerangis articulata grows in Madagascar and Comoran. Warm to hot growing, fragrant, grows best mounted. It is fragrant and blooms in fall.

I will not be adding more Aerangis species. This has been interesting, but I am trying to be more focused on stated collection goal of New World orchids.

Monday, August 30, 2010

Miltonia spectabilis semi-alba

Miltonia spectabilis semi-alba - Flower photo by Richard LindbergMiltonia spectabilis is a great specimen plant. It develops two new growths with each generation and the flowers are all open at the same time. I have some seen some amazing displays be it in a pot, a table mount or on cork. Since I have some large pieces of cork that is what I used. This is only the second year of growth and already spreading out nicely.

Miltonia spectabilis semi-alba - Plant photo by Richard LindbergThe genus Miltonia (Milt) contains 10 species from Brazil and Peru. They grow in bright warm conditions. Miltonia spectabilis grows in Brazil. It is cool to hot growing. Light level should be high and it should be a pale green. Blooms in summer and fall.

I am a little surprised that there are any flowers on this plant. It is growing in a spot that is fine for growing but I thought was too dark for blooming. The flower is on the brightest end of the mount.

I am moving it to Sonoma for the rest of the growing season. I will want next year to be in full flower. There is a window of three to four years where the display is very nice. After that, there are too many backbulbs. Backbulbs don't bloom.

Sunday, August 29, 2010

Mystery Maxillaria, any idea what?

Another of the Sonoma collection has bloomed for the first time since I started taking care of it. There are very few Maxillaria plants in the collection and I was hoping to be able to identify it.

I can tell that I have re-potted it but there is no sign of a tag. The tag might have been missing or blank. The flower by itself is nice enough but is hidden down in the plant. I don't know it is a species so I don't plan to look through OrchidSpecies.com.

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Epidendrum peperomia

Epidendrum peperomia - Plant photo by Richard Lindberg


Epidendrum peperomia - Flower photo by Richard LindbergThere is a saying in the orchid community that if you are growing beautiful, deep green foliage, all you will grow is beautiful, deep green fosiage. This Epidendrum peperomia is a good example. I have had only a few flowers in past years in what I thought were the correct conditions for this plant.

Epidendrum peperomia grows from Nicaragua to Ecuador in pine and oak forests. Cool to warm growing, low light. AKA Neolehmannia porpax.

This spring the plant got "temporarily" put in a fairly high light area of the greenhouse. I saw a flower and when I picked it up, I found the end if the plant covered with new growth and buds.

Epidendrum peperomia - Plant photo by Richard Lindberg

Seen from another angle, the difference in size and color is more obvious as the plant grows toward the light.

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Dendrobium Ellen 'Zonks' x den Ku-Ring-Gai 'Bobin'

Dendrobium Ellen 'Zonks' x den Ku-Ring-Gai 'Bobin' - Flower photo by Richard LindbergThis Dendrobium hybrid was bought early on, one of my first Dendrobiums of any kind. When I built the greenhouse it actually did worst than it had been doing indoors. The reason was over-watering.Dendrobium Ellen 'Zonks' x den Ku-Ring-Gai 'Bobin' - Plant photo by Richard Lindberg My greenhouse is too wet for potted Dendrobiums. I have moved all of the to Sonoma.

The plant finally looked so bad that I stripped off a few keikis and thew the plant in the garden waste. The keikis didn't do well either. They finally went over to Sonoma with a few of the other Catt and Den backbulbs.

In Sonoma they perked up and started to grow. I now have three of these plants. They are very small but they are beyond the keiki stage are have their own new growths.

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Dendrobium fimbriatum oculatum

Dendrobium fimbriatum oculatum - Flower photo by Richard Lindberg

Dendrobium fimbriatum oculatum - Flower photo by Richard LindbergDendrobium fimbriatum is my largest Dendrobium plant. Not all that many canes but very wide and hard to manage. I just went out and took a flash picture. I need an updated plant picture, so if I can get a little help, I will bring it out of the greenhouse.

Dendrobium fimbriatum oculatum - Plant photo by Richard LindbergDendrobium fimbriatum grows throughout Southeast Asia. It is cool to warm growing in humid pine forests at lower elevations. It is large, deciduous and needs bright light. Give it reduced water in winter but not completely dry.

It was a free plant and it came potted in November just under three years ago. The picture on the right was taken then after I mounted it. It was though to get steady on the cork and the next year I re-mounted it.

It bloomed the first year, four flowers on one spike. Last year a little better, but still one spike. This year I was thrilled to see five spikes and many more buds.

For a Dendrobium, the flowers don't last long at all. I will try to transport it to an orchid society meeting. With five spikes one will be open in 3 weeks.

Monday, August 23, 2010

Masdevallia Angel Tang

Masdevallia Angel Tang - Flower photo by Richard LindbergMasdevallia Angel Tang was one of my very first orchids. She bought it at a farmer's market in Santa Cruz, CA. The vendor assured her that it would be easy for me to grow and he was probably right in the Pacific coastal region. Napa is not coastal and few people grow Masd here. It never bloomed indoors and was hard to keep from drying out. Once it went into the intermediate greenhouse it perked up and became a reliable bloomer in a cool microclimate.

Masdevallia Angel Tang - Plant photo by Richard LindbergI have had varying success with the subtribe Pleurothallidinae species in the greenhouse but they are getting harder and harder to keep alive as the greenhouse climate has changed. The last 12 months the base temperature has been higher with wetter summers and dryer winters. With a minimum temperature set at 62 degrees, it is no longer an intermediate greenhouse. Through all that, Masdevallia Angel Tang has done better than most and is in bloom now.

Sunday, August 22, 2010

Cattleya Orchidglade 'ZOI'

Cattleya Orchidglade 'ZOI' - Flower photo by Richard Lindberg

Cattleya Orchidglade 'ZOI' - Flower photo by Richard LindbergI love blooming a plant for the first time. This Cattleya Orchidglade 'ZOI' (I think it is 'ZOI' altho '201' or 'Z01' are equally possible) just bloomed. It is a rescue so I am not worried about the single flower. There will be more next time. This is Cattleya walkeriana x Cattleya aurantiaca and should bloom twice a year with 5-6 flowers.

This is a rescue, not a backbulb division. The lead was not removed when it was potted. There were no live roots and I simply wanted to get the plant started again. It is not an attractive plant and will end up in a couple of years with all the old growth gone. For now, I am going for function over form; the old growth may not look good, but it is supplying energy to the new growth.

Saturday, August 21, 2010

Neofinetia falcata

Neofinetia falcata - Flower photo by Richard LindbergI just bought a Neofinetia falcata. It is a replacement for my collection plant that I lost due to not having a dog barrier in place at the greenhouse door. My new dog ate it. Neofinetia falcata - Plant photo by Richard LindbergI had been growing it for some time and it was coming along nicely. That's what it looked like on the right.

The genus Neofinetia (Neof) contains 3 species from Japan, Korea and the Ryukyu Islands. Neofinetia falcata grows in Japan, Korea and the Ryukyu Islands. The species grows on deciduous trees and get more light in winter. They are fragrant and tolerate a wide range of temperatures. They are collected more for the foliage than for the flowers. I am amazed at the price of some of these plants.

The new Neofinetia falcata plant with 6 fansA bonus Neofinetia falcata seedlingThe new plant will be mounted in the same manner in faux-Japanese style. This involves an inverted clay pot (in place of the gold wire framework) and the longest strands of sphagnum I can find.

There is an interesting bonus plant. It has the appearance of a seedling with one small fan. It is really as old as the other plant but was overgrown by the other plant. I will mount it separately on cork. I recently saw a Neofinetia falcata mounted that way and it was quite attractive.

Friday, August 20, 2010

Rhyncholaeliocattleya Autumn Mist 'Nostalgia'

Rhyncholaeliocattleya Autumn Mist 'Nostalgia' sprouting after almost two years

One of the plants in the worst condition when I started maintaining the Sonoma collection was this Rhyncholaeliocattleya Autumn Mist 'Nostalgia'. It was over-potted and had bugs on it. When I removed it from the pot I found that there were hardly any live roots. There was one leafless pseudobulb that looked as if it might sprout.

Rhyncholaeliocattleya Autumn Mist 'Nostalgia', the original lead divisionThis plant could easily have been sent directly to the yard waste can but I decided to give it a try. It is Cattleya Roman Silver x Rlc Malworth, Registered by Sea God Nursery in 1996. In my opinion, any plant from Sea God Nursery is a collectible plant.

The obvious first step was to remove the youngest pseudobulb which was the lead and pot it in rock to sprout. After a time it did, and the picture on the right shows it about a year ago, nicely developing into a new plant. Still a couple of years from blooming but well on its way.

At the same time as the lead was removed, the rest of the plant was returned to the original pot with rock instead of bark. This was not because I thought it would sprout but because I don't throw much away if it is green at all.

An example of the strong survival instinct in orchidsIt is now almost two years later and over that time it has got progressively more dead looking. It is not completely brown but hey, what could happen from that?

This is going back in the pot of rocks. I will leave it exactly as I found it. Where it could be drawing energy I have no idea. The roots are too small to be effective. I will watch it more closely and when the roots have developed to more than an inch, maybe two, it will stay as a backbulb. If I remove it too soon I decrease the chance that it will continue to develop.

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Cattleya forbesii

Cattleya forbesii - Flower photo by Richard LindbergI was going write that the Cattleya forbesii I bought recently as bloomed. But that would be wrong, since what you see is actually half of the plant I bought. I have a policy of not only re-potting plants as soon as I get them, but of dividing them if possible.

Cattleya forbesii - Flower photo by Richard LindbergCattleya forbesii grows in Brazil near the coast and streams near the ocean. It is fragrant, cool to warm growing and blooms in the winter. It is best grown mounted and in bright light.

The reason that this plant is in a pot instead of being mounted is that I saw a spike shadow in the sheath so I figured I would let it bloom.

The other half is in a pot of rocks too but for another reason. It is all backbulbs and I want to see the location of the sprout before mounting it.