Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Cattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr'

Cattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr' - Flower photo by Richard LindbergCattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr' - Flower photo by Richard LindbergHere is a great example of why I never give up on a backbulb until the very end. This was a four pseudobulb division with no lead and no roots. It was removed to shape and reduce the size of a plant two years ago. Since that time it has done NOTHING but slowly die.

Cattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr'

I am cleaning up the Sonoma greenhouse in preparation for moving my plants out. I was heading toward the garbage can when I looked down and spotted a sprout. The plant was right on the verge and it was using its last bit of energy to start a new plant.

When I looked more closely at the plant I was able to see that there was indeed some green. This plant will now be potted and given a chance to return to collection status. It is a classic, a cross between Cattleya Bonanza x Cattleya Horace. It was developed by Fred Stewart and registered with the RHS in 1967.

5 comments:

  1. That's amazing. Are you going to pot it differently than it had been?

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  2. Yes. It is now in a 3-inch clay pot in sphagnum over peanuts.

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  3. Lolly, don't you have a Bulbo backbulb that you sprouted? How's it doing?

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  4. Approx. 5 months later, I'm curious about the plant's progress. Has it survived?

    Will add that I've been very successful in bringing plants "back from the brink" using the product "Superthrive". As I'm not a scientist (and also don't work for Superthive - lol) I won't attempt explaining how. But it does seem to dramatically stimulate root growth. I also use it for repotted/divided plants, for the same reason.

    Lastly, I've enjoyed your blog, which I happily stumbled across this morning.

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