Saturday, July 27, 2013

Cattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr'

Cattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr' - Flower photo by Richard LindbergCattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr' - Flower photo by Richard LindbergThis plant was a two pseudobulb rootless backbulb division. I had thought it had died completely but it turns out that it didn't. The sprout has started to grow since I moved it to a 3-inch pot and sphagnum last December.

Cattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr' - Plant photo by Richard LindbergCattleya Drumbeat 'Minerva Burr' is the cross Cattleya Bonanza x Cattleya Horace, registered by Stewart in 1967. It has a very showy flower with two to four open at a time.

I think I will keep it. It was re-potted a few months ago and deserves a chance to get used to the new pot. Besides, it is a great example of how far down an orchid can go and still make a comeback.

5 comments:

  1. Keep the beauty! You brought it back to life and will be rewarded with all your efforts with adorable flowers. Maria Palanca

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  2. Richard - I wanted to share my success story due to your blog, which has been inspiring over the past 6 months. There is an elderly retail/wholesale orchid grower in the next town over. I've bought plants and supplies from him over the past 20 years. Three months ago I stopped just at closing time and snapped up an oncidium. He and I had a nice chat and he was off. As I pulled out, something told me to peek in his dumpster. There sat at least 10 plants that had been discarded due to being weak, needing to be divided or lack of blooms. During our conversation at the greenhouse, he showed me examples of plants he "just doesn't have time for any more". I've been back several times to the dumpster and have rescued no less that 10 plants each time. Some look like the one you've posted here - not much to it. Yet, I brought them home, cleaned them up, divided and potted and let them rest. Sometimes they're too large to retrieve from the bottom of the dumpster. Of the orchids I've brought home, many have new growth, 2 have spikes and one is ready to bloom. I know the snow/frost will likely kill discarded plants come the winter. I just can't stop going knowing those orchids needs to be rescued. I thought about approaching the grower and asking him to set-aside his cast-offs and I'll come once a week and collect them and give him something for his time to save them for me. Not sure how he'll take it, as I don't need to buy perfect plants from his stock any longer. Giving these plants another chance seems like a win for all. Any thoughts? Thanks for this blog and the inspiration.

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    1. Don't ask him to set them aside, if he agrees you will find yourself committed to more than you want. But this is still an opportunity for you. The trick is to harden your heart and start being selective. Keep bringing them home to clean and study. Then pick ones that you want as part of your collection, then discard or pass on the rest. What you are doing is great experience, but the proper use is to refine your collection.

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  3. This blog is so inspiring. I do love orchids too, they make my everyday complete...

    saving a cast-off orchids maybe another thing... maybe it will make me love not just the flowers but also the roots, the bulbs and everything.

    Thankyou so much for the inspirations, I will surely give it a try.

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    1. I like to think of the flowers as a present from the plant for taking good care of it.

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