Sunday, June 30, 2013

Cattleya loddigesii 'Blue Sky' AM/AOS

Cattleya loddigesii 'Blue Sky' AM/AOS - Plant photo by Richard LindbergIn 2008 I got a Cattleya loddigesii 'Blue Sky' AM/AOS and made four divisions. I should have waited for it to bloom before dividing, because I am still waiting. I would like to sell a couple of the divisions and I don't have a flower picture. And it is a very nice flower.

Cattleya loddigesii grows in Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay. It is fragrant, cool to warm growing and can grow in sunlight. The flowers are long lasting and blooming is in late summer.

This plant is potted in sphagnum over peanuts in a 5 1/2-inch clay pot. It is growing well and it looks as if it will bloom this year. My best bet is to just be patient and sell in late summer.

Saturday, June 29, 2013

Dendrobium moschatum

On a leafless cane sticking out into the greenhouse is a Dendrobium moschatum inflorescence. It will be gone in a few days but the canes will remain sprawled around the mount. The flowers are pretty but the plant is ugly, at least the way it is growing for me.

Dendrobium moschatum - Flower photo by Richard Lindberg title=

Dendrobium moschatum - Flower photo by Richard LindbergDendrobium moschatum - Flower photo by Richard LindbergDendrobium moschatum grows in Southeast Asia at low altitudes. It is cool to hot growing, needs bright light and is fragrant. It blooms spring into summer on leafless canes. Flowers last only a few days. The genus Dendrobium (Den) contains 1200 species from all parts of Asia and the Pacific. Some like a dry winter rest, all like to dry out between watering. Flowers on many species are long lasting.

I think the best solution is to take it to the orchid society meeting. It is too big to fit into a 20-box, the longest I have. One way or the other, this one is out the door in July.

Friday, June 28, 2013

Stanhopea grandiflora

Stanhopea grandiflora - Plant photo by Richard LindbergStanhopea grandiflora - Plant photo by Richard LindbergAbout five years ago I went through a phase of wanting more Stanhopea species so when I won a plant at the SFOS I grabbed this Stanhopea grandiflora. It was quite small and in a pot. I moved it to a basket in sphagnum. A couple of years later I moved it to a larger basket.

Stanhopea grandiflora grows in eastern South America. It is warm to hot growing and fragrant. It blooms in summer and fall. The genus Stanhopea (Stan) contains 55 species growing from Mexico, through Central America and South America.

It has never bloomed although a spike blasted in 2012. I cleaned it up and took one small natural division off the side. Now what do I do with it? It could be put back in the basket or tied to a nylon rope and suspended potless.

I am going to let someone else decide. Look for it on my eBay listings. I am sorry I won't get to see the six-inch white flower myself.

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Laelia lobata Coerulea 'Paulo Hoppe'

Laelia lobata Coerulea 'Paulo Hoppe' - Flower photo by Richard LindbergLaelia lobata Coerulea 'Paulo Hoppe' - Flower photo by Richard LindbergThis Laelia lobata is an example of how backbulb propagation is supposed to work.

The top of the plant looked great. There were the original two backbulbs trimmed from the collection plant in 2011. It sprouted and was potted in sphagnum and clay in November. Laelia lobata Coerulea 'Paulo Hoppe' - Plant photo by Richard LindbergThe sprout matured in 2012 and it sprouted three new growths. When I pulled this backbulb division out of the pot, here is what I found.

The roots on the 2012 growth are strong as shown by the size of the pseudobulb. It is quite large for a first sprout even it is is smaller than the backbulbs.

Laelia lobata grows in Brazil on the coast on rocks exposed to full sun and ocean spray. It is cool to hot growing, fragrant and blooms in spring. The genus Laelia (L) has a few species in Mexico and parts of Central America. Most species that were in the Laelia genus have been moved to Cattleya.

Since I have two other divisions, this will be on eBay this week starting Saturday afternoon. I hope to have a longer list than the two I have this week.

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Stanhopea tigrina

Stanhopea tigrina - Flower photo by Richard LindbergStanhopea tigrina - Flower photo by Richard LindbergThe next big space hog is Stanhopea tigrina. I have had the plant for ten years. It has grown from a half a dozen pseudobulb division to a massive rootball supported by nylon cord. My "Stanhope on a rope". I don't want to do anything to it just now because it is about to start blooming.

Stanhopea tigrina - Plant photo by Richard Lindberg

Stanhopea tigrina grows in Mexico at about 2000 feet. It is cool to warm growing, fragrant and blooms in the summer and fall. The flowers are pendant and last only 3 to 5 days. The genus Stanhopea (Stan) contains 55 species growing from Mexico, through Central America and South America.

Stanhopea tigrina - Plant photo by Richard LindbergThis plant has grown around the rope and the effect is good. Three strands of yellow nylon going down to the top of the plant with pseudobulbs all over. This picture is from three or four years ago when there were four spikes open at the same time. It is quite a dramatic effect.

This year the buds are a different stages so that there is a chance that one will be open for an orchid society meeting "Show and Tell".

I don't know just yet what I will do with this plant. The ball is very tight and the rhizomes short so there won't be any large divisions. I want to have one, but perhaps I should go back to a small division and let it grow out again.

Monday, June 24, 2013

Miltonia (spectabulis x Jim MacKinney)

The next space hog is this mounted Miltonia hybrid. It is starting new growths and has initiated spikes. I took it apart yesterday.

Miltonia (spectabulis x Jim MacKinney) - Plant photo by Richard Lindberg

Miltonia (spectabulis x Jim MacKinney) - Flower photo by Richard LindbergMiltonia (spectabulis x Jim MacKinney) - Flower photo by Richard LindbergMiltonia (Milt) contains 10 species from Brazil and Peru. They grow in bright warm conditions.

There are many divisions and quite a few backbulbs. I am going to offer those over the summer. But there are six that are nice divisions and have spikes initiated.

Here is how it works. You pay $5 plus actual postage and it comes Priority Mail. (I'll let you know, but it will be around $6.) Add a comment claiming it and then go to this page to get my direct email address so we can work out the details. Send me your shipping address. No first-time restriction for this one!

Miltonia (spectabulis x Jim MacKinney) divisionsMiltonia (spectabulis x Jim MacKinney) divisionsI want these out the door right away to get to their new homes and potted as soon as possible and so you can enjoy the flowers. The roots are a little sparse but the new growth will produce enough during the summer.

Miltonia (spectabulis x Jim MacKinney) - Plant photo by Richard Lindberg

I am flashing back on the old used car ads where the salesman sez
"I must be crazy to offer deals like this."

Sunday, June 23, 2013

Maxillaria tenuifolia

In looking for space hogs in the greenhouse, there was no question about that was the worst. It was the three large Maxillaria tenuifolia plants. This week I took them apart, trying to keep divisions as large as possible. As it turned out, I was not able to get any large divisions, but there were several that were respectable.

Maxillaria tenuifolia - Plant photo by Richard Lindberg

Maxillaria tenuifolia - Flower photo by Richard LindbergMaxillaria tenuifolia - Flower photo by Richard LindbergThe genus Maxillaria (Max) contains 650 some species spread throughout the tropical and sub-tropical Americas. They have a single flower. Generally warm to hot growing.

Maxillaria tenuifolia - Plant photo by Richard Lindberg

This is the large mounted plant and the resulting divisions. I will pot them all and let them settle in for a month, then start selling them. The smaller ones will be on the $5 table I am still working on setting up.

Saturday, June 22, 2013

Mormolyca ringens

Mormolyca ringens - Flower photo by Richard LindbergMormolyca ringens - Flower photo by Richard LindbergMormolyca ringens - Plant photo by Richard LindbergMaybe I need to define my collection better. Right now I am going an a size and emotion combination. Having this Mormolyca ringens in bloom has made me wonder if I shouldn't be more precise about the criteria for being part of the collection.

Mormolyca ringens grows from Mexico down into Central America. It is warm to hot growing and does well in a basket. The plant can flower all spring and summer. The genus Mormolyca (Mlca) contains 6 small species growing in Central America and northern South America.

This plant is in bark over peanuts in a 2 1/2-inch plastic pot. There are six pseudobulbs and it stands five inches above the pot. The flower open now is the third flower from this pseudobulb.

Friday, June 21, 2013

Neofinetia falcata

Neofinetia falcata - Plant photo by Richard LindbergNeofinetia falcata - Plant photo by Richard LindbergOne of the Neofinetia falcata plants is in bloom, and earlier than last year. It is doing well for me and I enjoy seeing it and how it is growing. That is the working definition of a plant I want as part of my collection.

Neofinetia falcata grows in Japan, Korea and the Ryukyu Islands. The species grows on deciduous trees and gets more light in winter. They are fragrant and tolerate a wide range of temperatures. The genus Neofinetia (Neof) contains 3 species from Japan, Korea and the Ryukyu Islands.

Neofinetia falcata - Flower photo by Richard LindbergNeofinetia falcata - Flower photo by Richard LindbergThe flowers are interesting but frustrating. They are white and I find it very hard to get definition. For this type of flower I will always take a new flower picture to see if I can make an improvement. This time I feel that I did.